Playing with words- -what fun!

In other words; expressed in a different way; that is to say.

Thank you to Google’s online dictionary for these phrases. The meaning of “in other words” is clear, but what about the words themselves? For this important research I’ll visit my 1976 edition of The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, in low-tech paperback:

In: In this instance, “in” qualifies as a preposition

Other: An adjective, meaning “different”

Words: Noun, a graphic representation of a speech sound that signifies meaning

So, we have a preposition, an adjective and a noun.

Summer is the perfect time for games and goofiness. Have you ever seen the “What’s Your Blues Name” chart? This device matches your initials to three lists of 26 words that are asserted to be commonly found in “Blues” names. For example, my initials, SDM, come out as “Blind Legs Lee” (I was “Blind Legs Jackson” before I was married). In the interest of summer fun, I’ve created my own chart, the purpose of which is to generate your personal phrase based on pairing your first initial with a preposition, your middle initial with an adjective and your last initial with a noun. Let’s try it!

Use your first initial to find your preposition*:

A=with

B=at

C=from

D=into

E=during

F=including

G=until

H=against

I=among

J=throughout

K=despite

L=towards

M=upon

N=concerning

O=of

P=to

Q=in

R=for

S=on

T=by

U=about

V=like

W=through

X=over

Y=before

Z=between

Now, use your middle initial for the adjective**:

A=boiling

B=breezy

C=broken

D=bumpy

E=chilly

F=cold

G=cool

H=creepy

I=crooked

J=cuddly

K=curly

L=damaged

M=damp

N=dirty

O=dry

P=dusty

Q=filthy

R=flaky

S=fluffy

T=freezing

U=hot

V=warm

W=wet

X=bitter

Y=delicious

Z=fresh

Finally, your last initial for the noun***:

A=mother

B=father

C=baby

D=child

E=toddler

F=teenager

G=lion

H=tiger

I=bear

J=dog

K=cat

L=alligator

M=table

N=truck

O=book

P=pencil

Q=city

R=state

S=country

T=continent

U=cricket

V=coat

W=coffee shop

X=grandmother

Y=wolf

Z=boots

Have you created your own, personal phrase? Good! Mine is “on bumpy table” (formerly “on bumpy mother”). Now, all that remains is to figure out, what, exactly, it means.

 

*From TalkEnglish.com list of Top 50 Prepositions https://www.talkenglish.com/vocabulary/top-50-prepositions.aspx

**List of touch and taste/touch adjectives from http://www.momswhothink.com/reading/list-of-adjectives.html but any list of 26 adjectives will do

***Examples of people, animals, places and things from http://www.k12reader.com/term/common-nouns/

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